Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://dx.doi.org/10.14279/depositonce-4627
Main Title: Costs of delivering human papillomavirus vaccination to schoolgirls in Mwanza Region, Tanzania
Author(s): Quentin, Wilm
Terris-Prestholt, Fern
Changalucha, John
Soteli, Selephina
Edmunds, W. John
Hutubessy, Raymond
Ross, David A.
Kapiga, Saidi
Hayes, Richard
Watson-Jones, Deborah
Type: Article
Language: English
Language Code: en
Abstract: Background: Cervical cancer is the leading cause of female cancer-related deaths in Tanzania. Vaccination against human papillomavirus (HPV) offers a new opportunity to control this disease. This study aimed to estimate the costs of a school-based HPV vaccination project in three districts in Mwanza Region (NCT ID: NCT01173900), Tanzania and to model incremental scaled-up costs of a regional vaccination program. Methods: We first conducted a top-down cost analysis of the vaccination project, comparing observed costs of age-based (girls born in 1998) and class-based (class 6) vaccine delivery in a total of 134 primary schools. Based on the observed project costs, we then modeled incremental costs of a scaled-up vaccination program for Mwanza Region from the perspective of the Tanzanian government, assuming that HPV vaccines would be delivered through the Expanded Programme on Immunization (EPI). Results: Total economic project costs for delivering 3 doses of HPV vaccine to 4,211 girls were estimated at about US$349,400 (including a vaccine price of US$5 per dose). Costs per fully-immunized girl were lower for class-based delivery than for age-based delivery. Incremental economic scaled-up costs for class-based vaccination of 50,290 girls in Mwanza Region were estimated at US$1.3 million. Economic scaled-up costs per fully-immunized girl were US$26.41, including HPV vaccine at US$5 per dose. Excluding vaccine costs, vaccine could be delivered at an incremental economic cost of US$3.09 per dose and US$9.76 per fully-immunized girl. Financial scaled-up costs, excluding costs of the vaccine and salaries of existing staff were estimated at US$1.73 per dose. Conclusions: Project costs of class-based vaccination were found to be below those of age-based vaccination because of more eligible girls being identified and higher vaccine uptake. We estimate that vaccine can be delivered at costs that would make HPV vaccination a very cost-effective intervention. Potentially, integrating HPV vaccine delivery with cost-effective school-based health interventions and a reduction of vaccine price below US$5 per dose would further reduce the costs per fully HPV-immunized girl.
URI: urn:nbn:de:kobv:83-opus4-70363
http://depositonce.tu-berlin.de/handle/11303/4924
http://dx.doi.org/10.14279/depositonce-4627
Issue Date: 2012
Date Available: 11-Aug-2015
DDC Class: 610 Medizin und Gesundheit
Subject(s): Africa
Costs and cost analysis
Economics papillomavirus vaccines
Uterine cervical neoplasms
Creative Commons License: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/
Journal Title: BMC Medicine
Publisher: BioMed Central
Publisher Place: London
Volume: 10
Article Number: 137
Publisher DOI: 10.1186/1741-7015-10-137
Notes: Published By BioMed Central Quentin, Wilm ; Terris-Prestholt, Fern ; Changalucha, John ; Soteli, Selephina ; Edmunds, W. John ; Hutubessy, Raymond ; Ross, David A. ; Kapiga, Saidi ; Hayes, Richard ; Watson-Jones, Deborah : Costs of delivering human papillomavirus vaccination to schoolgirls in Mwanza Region,Tanzania. - In: BMC Medicine. - ISSN 1741-7015 (online). - 10 (2012), art. 137. - doi:10.1186/1741-7015-10-137.
Appears in Collections:Technische Universität Berlin » Fakultäten & Zentralinstitute » Fakultät 7 Wirtschaft und Management » Institut für Technologie und Management (ITM) » Publications

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