Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://dx.doi.org/10.14279/depositonce-8131
Main Title: Phosphorus recovery from municipal and fertilizer wastewater: China's potential and perspective
Author(s): Zhou, Kuangxin
Barjenbruch, Matthias
Kabbe, Christian
Inial, Goulven
Remy, Christian
Type: Article
Language Code: en
Is Part Of: 10.14279/depositonce-6501
Abstract: Phosphorus (P) is a limited resource, which can neither be synthesized nor substituted in its essential functions as nutrient. Currently explored and economically feasible global reserves may be depleted within generations. China is the largest phosphate fertilizer producing and consuming country in the world. China's municipal wastewater contains up to 293,163 Mg year of phosphorus, which equals approximately 5.5% of the chemical fertilizer phosphorus consumed in China. Phosphorus in wastewater can be seen not only as a source of pollution to be reduced, but also as a limited resource to be recovered. Based upon existing phosphorus-recovery technologies and the current wastewater infrastructure in China, three options for phosphorus recovery from sewage sludge, sludge ash and the fertilizer industry were analyzed according to the specific conditions in China.
URI: https://depositonce.tu-berlin.de//handle/11303/9021
http://dx.doi.org/10.14279/depositonce-8131
Issue Date: 2017
Date Available: 24-Jan-2019
DDC Class: 620 Ingenieurwissenschaften und zugeordnete Tätigkeiten
Subject(s): Phosphorus recovery
Municipal Wastewater
Fertilizer Industry
Sewage sludge
China
License: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
Journal Title: Journal of Environmental Sciences
Publisher: Elsevier
Publisher Place: Amsterdam
Volume: 52
Publisher DOI: 10.1016/j.jes.2016.04.010
Page Start: 151
Page End: 159
EISSN: 1878-7320
ISSN: 1001-0742
Appears in Collections:Inst. Bauingenieurwesen » Publications

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